William Dunbar (1460- 1530)

William Dunbar (1460- 1530)

Dunbar was a Scottish poet who was employed at the Scottish Court. While on a diplomatic mission, he was shipwrecked and given a pension by James-IV in 1500. His poems are notable for their wide range of subjects and tone. His Thrissil and the Rose is a political allegory about the marriage of James-IV to Margaret Tudor which was believed to have been written in 1503. The Dance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis was written in 1507 wherein the narrator watches a devil calling a dance of outcasts. Around that time only he wrote, The Golden Targe and The Lament For Makaris. The former is a dream-vision love adventure; the latter is an elegy on the transitory nature of life and the passing of great English and Scottish poets like Chaucer, Henryson and Gower. His The Tretis of the Twa Marlit Wemen and the Wedo is an experience in which a male narrator overhears the three women revealing their stories and their ambitions. His Flying of Dunbar and Kennedie is an exercise in poetic abuse. Dunbar is called as the Burns of the fifteenth century.

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